The Succulent - Your Dependable Houseplant

By Janessa Running

If you have ever dreamed of making a dish garden or would like to add more life and interest to your home's landscaping, look no further than the hardy succulent plant. Succulents are booming in popularity - and for good reason! They are both beautiful and nearly indestructible.  

Stop by The Village Shoppe, where all succulent plants are currently 30% off!
 

 

About Succulents 
A succulent is any plant with thick, fleshy (succulent) water storage organs. Succulents store water in their leaves, stems, or roots. These plants have adapted to survive arid conditions throughout the world, from Africa to the deserts of North America. Fortunately for us, this adaptive mechanism has resulted in an incredible variety of interesting leaf forms and plant shapes, including paddle leaves, tight rosettes, and bushy or trailing columns of teardrop leaves. As a group, succulents include some of the most well-known plants, such as the aloe and agave, as well as include many plants that are not well known. Cacti are a unique subset of the succulent group.

No matter what kind of succulent you're growing, the rules of care are similar between the different species. Here are the general guidelines for growing top-quality succulents:

Light:
Succulents prefer bright light, such as found on a south-facing window. Watch the leaves for indications that the light level is correct. Some species will scorch if suddenly exposed to direct sunlight. The leaves will turn brown or white as the plant bleaches out and the soft tissues are destroyed. Alternatively, an under lit succulent will begin to stretch, with an elongated stem and widely spaced leaves. This condition is known as etoliation. The solution is to provide better light and prune the plant back to its original shape. Many kinds of succulents will thrive outdoors in the summer.

Temperature:
Succulents are much more cold-tolerant than many people assume. As in the desert, where there is often a marked contrast between night and day, succulents thrive in colder nights, down to even 40ºF. Ideally, succulents prefer daytime temperatures between 70ºF and about 85ºF and nighttime temperatures between 50ºF and 55ºF.

Water:
Succulents should be watered generously in the summer. The potting mix should be allowed to dry between waterings, but do not underwater. During the winter, when the plant goes dormant, cut watering back to once every other month. Overwatering and ensuing plant rot is the single most common cause of plant failure. Be aware, though, that an overwatered succulent might at first plump up and look very healthy. However, the cause of death may have already set in underground, with rot spreading upward from the root system. A succulent should never be allowed to sit in water. The following are signs of under- or over-watering:

    Over-watering. Over-watered plants are soft and discolored. The leaves may be yellow or white and lose their color. A plant in this condition may be beyond repair, but you can still remove it from its pot and inspect the roots. If they are brown and rotted, cut away dead roots and repot into drier potting media, or take a cutting and propagate the parent plant.

    Under-watering: Succulents prefer generous water during the growing season (spring and summer). An under watered plant will first stop growing, then begin to shed leaves. Alternatively, the plant may develop brown spots on the leaves.

Potting Soils:
Succulents should be potted in a fast-draining mixture that's designed for cacti and succulents. If you don't have access to a specialized mix, considering modifying a normal potting mix with an inorganic agent like Perlite to increase aeration and drainage. These plants generally have shallow roots that form a dense mat just under the soil surface.

Fertilizer:
During the summer growing season, fertilizer as you would with other houseplants. Stop fertilizing entirely during the winter.


Succulent Design Inspiration